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Tag / japanese cinema

Emotional Support Animals: Rarecho and Netflix’s “Aggretsuko”

Five days a week, from 8am until 5pm, Gwen could be found sitting calmly at the reception desk of a Chicago architecture firm. This was her job – her “survival job,” she told people back home. Freelance writing and literary management not serving to pay her rent, Gwen had joined the silent ranks of the artistically unfulfilled, eager for the day when she could stick up a middle finger to her job, quitting as she marched out the front door and into the awaiting limousine to success.

It was a dumb fantasy, and Gwen knew that. It’ll be a cab, not a limo, she thought to herself. But in her heart, she knew she wouldn’t be quitting the job soon – and when she did, wouldn’t want to burn bridges with the people who had been nice to her while there. As she set a phone back in its dock and began to type out client information into a spreadsheet, she considered her ideal departure from work: a new job arising in theatre, the discomforting assertiveness of handing in two weeks notice, the inevitable half-hearted departure conversations about staying in touch and we-hope-you’ll-visit-us-soon. This would happen. In the future. Not now.

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Acting Your Age: Takashi Nakamura’s “Pītā Pan No Bōken”

Dania emerged from her room and immediately stared at Eleanor.

“What?”

“You didn’t tell me…” Dania began, walking further into the room, “that there was a Daddy Long Legs anime, too!”

Eleanor exhaled. “Oh, yeah. There is.”

The ads for the show, Watashi No Ashinaga Ojisan, had run at the conclusion of the last few episodes of Pītā Pan No Bōken. This was in lieu of the show’s traditional, “Next Week On…” ending, for fear of spoiling what would happen next.

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Away In A Manger: Satoshi Kon’s “Tokyo Godfathers”

Meet the Hanslick Girls: Gwen, Eleanor and Dania. Created by writer Zach Barr, they are a trio of friends who are always out experiencing the best of entertainment. Be it plays, films, concerts, exhibits, or games, they’ve learned that the arts are best when experienced together. They may not have the same opinions, but their conversations tend to make for an entertaining read. To celebrate Christmas Day, the Girls take a look at one of the more unconventional holiday specials: a 2003 film about family, faith, and second chances. Let’s hear what they had to say…

 

“That’s a…rather contrived note to end the movie on.”

“I’m satisfied,” Eleanor said, watching as the credits rolled by to a reggae-like cover of “Ode To Joy” – which perhaps had something to do with New Year’s Eve, but in practice seemed an odd choice.

“Huh,” Dania grunted. The film was her recommendation – she had grow up watching the unconventional holiday movie, and had wanted to share it with her friends. She was lucky to find a version with good subtitles online. The film lost something without its powerful original voice actors – even in a foreign language, the passion of their delivery helped the movie spring to life.

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