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The Hanslick Girls

"Three is company, safe and cheery" -Stephen Sondheim

Tag / sequel

The Cover Is Not The Book: Disney and Rob Marshall’s “Mary Poppins Returns”

As they walked out of the theatre, Hazel was still humming the repetitive melody to “Trip A Little Light Fantastic,” her feet tapping along like the dancers in the film. Her wide grin was a contrast to the more stoic, contemplative look her older sister held as they returned to the parking lot.

“What did you think of the movie, Hazel?” Gwen prompted.

“I loved it!” Hazel shouted. Gwen put a finger to her lips, and Hazel’s head dropped slightly. “Oops,” she whispered. “Sorry.”

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Far From Home: Alexandra Silber’s “After Anatevka”

Despite being the one to suggest that they read it, Gwen was the last to finish reading After Anatevka. She had put it off: work got in the way, or she meant to bring it on the El with her but forgot, or it was lumpy to carry around anyway. Excuses, excuses, she knew. But the fact remained that, on the afternoon when Gwen finally closed the book shut with a satisfying slap, Eleanor was already waiting on the couch.

“Oh, finally,” she said, as Gwen sat up in her chair. “Now we can discuss.”

“Not so fast,” Gwen pulled back. There was much to be digested in the book, and Gwen wanted enough time. “I have to think about it first.”

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Rekindled Under Water: Disney/PIXAR’s “Finding Dory”

—Originally written June 19, 2016—

Meet the Hanslick Girls: Gwen, Eleanor and Dania. Created by writer Zach Barr, they are a trio of Northwestern students who always go to see art together. They may not have the same opinions, but their conversations tend to make for an entertaining read. Recently, the Girls saw “Finding Dory,” PIXAR’s recently released sequel to 2003’s “Finding Nemo.” Let’s hear what they had to say on their way back from the theater…

 

The dull thumping of feet coming from the hallway informed Eleanor’s mother that her daughter was on her way to the living room. Tearing in between the boxes, still waiting to be unpacked, Eleanor’s head poked into view as she held aloft a plastic turtle and soared him through the air in the apartment.

“Gnarly, dude!” Eleanor said, loudly. She wove around the nearly empty apartment, the plastic toy leading the way as her mother watched from behind the kitchen counter. “You so totally rock, Squirt!”

Her mother laughed.

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